Backup Adult & Senior Care

Your Backup Adult and Senior Care benefit can help you find the right in-home care, right when you need it

Please note the following enhancements, changes, and next steps regarding our Backup Adult and Senior Care benefit (effective July 15, 2020 – June 30, 2021):
  • Employees may now request up to 15 days of combined Backup Adult/Senior and Child Care per fiscal year
  • Backup Adult and Senior Care is now available at the more affordable rate of $8 per hour
  • Employees who have used or booked Backup Care in FY21: you will receive an email outlining how these changes will impact you

The MIT Center for WorkLife and WellBeing offers 15 days of Backup Adult and Senior Care * through Care@Work. This benefit delivers in-home care and support across the US, including:

  • light meal preparation and light housekeeping
  • medication prompting
  • assistance with bathing and dressing
  • rides to doctor's appointments
  • companionship
  • specialized support for Alzheimer's and Dementia

Care is provided through professional homecare agencies, which have been vetted by Care@Work Backup Care Specialists, and is available 24/7 to you or a loved one, either your home or the home of the adult or senior in need of care.

*Available to current, benefits-eligible faculty, staff, postdoc associates, postdoc fellows, and family members, who may request up to 15 total combined Backup Adult and Senior Care and Backup Child Care referrals per fiscal year (July 15, 2020 – June 30, 2021).

How to register and request care

Step 1: Visit mit.care.com and register for your Care@Work benefits by completing the enrollment form.

Step 2:  Contact a Care@Work Backup Adult and Senior Care Specialist at 866-228-2965 x 1, during regular business hours (Monday – Friday, 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. EST) to schedule care.

When speaking with your Backup Adult and Senior Care Specialist:

  • Identify yourself as an MIT employee (includes faculty, staff, and postdoc associates) or postdoctoral fellow.
  • Provide a brief overview of your (or your loved one's) situation and care needs.

Your Backup Adult and Senior Care Specialist will then try to identify an agency that meets your (or your loved one's) specific needs, and that agency will contact you to finalize arrangements. You are responsible for paying the hourly cost of the adult caregiver, which is currently $8.00 per hour in Massachusetts (this cost may vary slightly if care is provided out-of-state), with a minimum of 4 hours per day and a maximum of 10 hours per day. Your credit card will be charged for the care provided at the end of service.

Additional Adult and Senior Care Resources

Adult and Senior Care Advising

Adult and Senior Care Advising through Care@Work provides you and your family members with ongoing advice and guidance from master's level social workers, who specialize in helping families navigate their caregiving challenges. 

 Learn more 

MIT Center for WorkLife and WellBeing Caring for Aging Parents Seminar Series

The MIT Center for WorkLife and WellBeing's "Caring for Aging Parents...What Worries You the Most" seminar series offers practical information and research-based strategies that will help you navigate your caregiving journey.

 Learn more

MIT Center for WorkLife and WellBeing Caregiver Newsletter
The MIT Center for WorkLife and WellBeing offers a monthly newsletter specifically for caregivers: "Caregiving: Resources and Support for You and Your Family." It features a Senior Care Tip of the Month, written by our Adult and Senior Care Advisors, and other MIT resources that can help support you and your family.

 

MIT MyLife Services Grief Counseling

Grief and bereavement counseling is available at no cost to MIT faculty, staff, postdocs, and their families, through MIT MyLife Services.

 Learn more

The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA)

The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) was enacted in 1993 and amended in 2008 to help employees balance the demands of work and family, and to care for their own and their families’ medical problems, without risking their jobs.

 Learn more

Have Questions?

Get in touch with the MIT Center for WorkLife and WellBeing.